Time to go through some things lurking in open tabs that I found interesting / cool / funny / neat, etc. I’ll leave it up to you to decide which was which.

I visited Uno earlier this year to visit Naoshima with my mum and her friend. We stayed at an excellent guesthouse called Uno Slope House. The proprieter is a Japanese fellow named Max, who has opened up his parents’ house for visitors, as well as trying to open up the area around Uno to more tourism. The Uno/ Naoshima area is trying to reinvent itself as an destination for artists. The museums and installations on Naoshima are certainly well worth a visit. As for Max, he’s a filmmaker, and is also one of the main organisers of a film festival that takes place in August every year in Uno. This year’s is going to be held over the first two weekends, so if you’re keen, try to head down there and enjoy some real Japanese hospitality along with the art. They’re also trying to raise funds to run the event, so if you’re feeling generous, there are some goodies in it for you as well. I might see you there!

This photo tour of an abandoned amusement park in the USA caught my eye. I could add it to the list of ghost towns I want to see. If I had the time and money, I would love to get more into astrophotography. I spent a short while up the top of Norway last Christmas and saw the aurora, which was phenomenal, but these pictures from Australia were also amazing. This photoset captures in great detail the stark reality of North Korea – a sterile showcase of perfection that somehow has stripped almost all vestige of humanity away from its citizenry. I’ve never seen such emptiness. (I still want to go there by the way…)

If you can force your way through it, you should try to read Umberto Eco’s Travels In Hyperreality. In particular the section on post-modernism and The Last Supper. It’s true, there are bizarre versions of it everywhere! The internet is also a great place to see the collective creative genius at work.

I’m glad to say that I’ve seen quite a few of these great films that have no plot.

I’m getting more and more into whisky, particularly 10 year-old single malts, but also the Irish varieties have caught my eye – as well as tastebuds. I have also recently been spending some time with some very naughty beers from Belgium and Germany. These are the sorts of beers that I wouldn’t mind taking on a dirty weekend somewhere….

I’ve tried a couple of these coffee hacks, such as buying a French press and adding a pinch of salt to the brew. Yummo.

I wouldn’t mind opening a tea house though.

Love Hotels are not just for Japan any more. Auckland says hello to its first.

I have enjoyed Sean Bean’s work for quite a while. He has the ability to play the kind of character who can be a badass but also be frail at the same time. Think of his roles in Lord of the Rings and Ronin. Last week they played Patriot Games on satellite TV and his character was just a one-way ticket to Hell and he didn’t care who he took along for the ride. Awesome. Now you’d think such a man might be a bit of a douche/chav in real life, but not if you’re a lady. He went out for a few drinks with an Italian Playboy model one night (as you do) and some punter started to insult her honour. He took the fella aside to have a quiet word. Later, when Sean went outside to have a cigarette, he got stabbed in the arm with some broken glass for his trouble. Did Sean Bean go to the hospital? NO. He walked back inside and ordered another drink. All hail!

You think your TVs big? Try this one on for size! You could try to get it in see-though format as well. That window/TV is not too far away.

The Swedes are funny. Really.

There has often been a lament about the lack of women in science and engineering. Some women have made an enormous difference to our understanding of our world and the universe. Dads, if you have daughters, I’d recommend you buy a microscope to go along with those toys. A great example in point is of Amelia Fraser-McKelvie. She was on a six-week internship at Monash University when she solved part of the riddle of the missing mass of the universe.

The story behind one of the greatest images of the Civil Rights movement.

Sadly, a lot of “more of the same” on the global front. The rich and the powerful don’t seem to have enough money and power and are seeking to take as much as they can from everyone else. In other words, what’s new?

Look at Libya. Yes Gaddafi is a madman and a despot, but he also had Africa’s best interests at heart. As this article points out, he wanted to take Africa to a single currency, based on a gold standard. He wanted customers to pay for oil in gold, not dollars. He funded programs to free Africa from dominance by international corporations and organisations. If you’re thinking this sounds familiar, Saddam Hussein did a similar thing before being killed off. Also it looks like Dominique Strauss-Kahn was undermining the dollar by calling for a new global currency, before news surfaced of his arrest for assaulting a maid.

Take a look at Europe. Its policymakers are looking to extending the power of its financial institutions to taking over the governments of a member country if they can’t run things the way they like it. Watch out Greece, Spain, Portugal, Ireland….

Don’t forget America. As it slides slowly toward collapse, the President believes he’s above the law and able to order the assassination of anyone he likes, the government is destroying its education systemgiving itself more power than we are aware they have and fighting wars without end, the rich are taking everything they can, and destroying the country in the process.

News from China that in 2010 there could well have been over 180,000 protests and demonstrations. That’s an average of nearly 500 per day! Some have been quite large and violent. Seems like the Chinese growth machine isn’t helping a lot of people.

In Australia, while the media and politicians scramble over the treatment of illegal immigrants, the elephant in the room is the treatment of the Aboriginal population. You won’t read about it in the Murdoch press though, which owns most of the major daily newspapers. John Pilger at his best.

The Department of Homeland Security may soon be changing its name to the Ministry of Peace, since it is starting to roll out 1984-esque technology that is “designed to identify people who intend to commit a terrorist act”. That’s right: thoughtcrime.

It’s fairly well known that the state of the health of Americans is getting worse and worse. Having no access to decent health cover, hospitals and food is one thing, but the recent statistics show that life expectantcy in the USA is declining at a noticeable rate.

Before long, that may also have something to do with the Fukushima situation, which looks like it now ranks as the worst nuclear disaster of all time. ‘Hot particles’ of radioactive isotopes of strontium, caesium and even plutonium have been showing up in Tokyo and as far as the west coast of the USA. This article says that there has been a spike in infant mortality in the western US since the Fukushima nuclear plant entered meltdown.  There might be a link, there might not. The lack of coverage on the right-wing news might indicate that it is hooey, but then again, the Russian atomic energy agency is pointing out that a nuclear plant in Nebraska, currently in trouble due to floods, is leaking radiation. (Yes, that is ironic) The silence from the American news is deafening. The fact that the largest operator of nuclear facilities has very close financial ties to Obama may also have something to do with it. In March I said I wasn’t worried about the radiation from the disaster, but that was based upon what I knew at the time. I refused to be drawn into the speculation and panic going on. Now, I am even reconsidering plans to travel to Tokyo for a holiday. I know I’m going to die some day, but I don’t want it to be from cancer caused by a stray particle of plutonium that I could have avoided by staying on this side of Japan.

Here was something interesting, stemming from a German report that the nuclear workers in Japan are disproportionally drawn from the ‘rejects’ of Japanese society, for example, the homeless and the burakumin.

Meanwhile, radiation has started appearing in crops of green tea. This happened in Shizuoka which is a) one of the largest tea growing areas in Japan, and b) west of Tokyo – supposedly a long way upwind of the evacuated nuclear-devastated areas surrounding Fukushima. The Japanese tea industry’s response was worry that people might switch to other forms of tea. Gee, thanks fellas. Keep up the good work.

It might be more expensive to get anything to eat as commodity speculation is pushing up food prices again, along with population growth, environmental destruction and (maybe) climate change. Coffee isn’t immune either, with the cost of raw green beans doubling in the past year.

The humble consumer can’t do much. Even hailed ‘environmentally friendly’ products such as those tagged as ‘biodegradable’ turn out to contribute to the problem. They often end up in landfill where they release methane.

Maybe we aren’t heading for another mini-Ice Age. Maybe we are. Maybe we’re heading for a time of much hotter weather. Maybe we aren’t. I’m with Ernst Mayr, George Carlin and Bill Hicks on this issue now. Carlin said, that the planet is fine – it’s had to deal with things much worse than us and it’s come back fine. Hicks said that if you’re truly a committed environmentalist, you should kill yourself and set the example for all of us to follow. More quietly, Ernst Mayr put forward the idea in a debate with Carl Sagan that intelligent life is perhaps a lethal mutation. I believe we’ve gone past the tipping point now and something is going to happen which will make life for humans much harder and a lot of people are going to die. The rich and powerful will still have access to their caviar and fine wine, so they won’t care – and since they don’t, who else will?

One problem with all this going on is that we’re all too busy to notice. We’re either working way longer hours, trying to multi-task and failing miserably in the process, or so busy looking over our shoulders in case someone tries to steal our jobs that we can’t work effectively. Stress is a killer. If you’re too busy to watch what the rich and powerful are doing – and are dying in the process – then they’re free to continue doing what they want.

Today in “My Religion Is Crazier Than Your Religion” News: A poor dog is in danger from a Jewish rabbinical court due to the belief that it is the reincarnation of a lawyer cursed by the same court twenty years ago.  Religion is certainly a great moneyspinner though – just look at the crazies who predicited the end of the world earlier this month. They’d raised more than US$100 million in just the past seven years – tax free. I’m in the wrong business.

Greetings and salutations.

So the huge controversy in Australia seems to be over this thing called ‘planking’. It’s when you pose like a plank in photos. The more unusual the setting, the better. I first read about it in ‘The Age’ since it’s about the only major newspaper in Australia that’s not Murdoch-owned. The initial article (which has since disappeared from the website) played up the fun aspect while the moderators of the associated Facebook page made sure to mention that saftey was a priority. Naturally, within three days, there has been an arrest for planking on a police car, and the first death involving a plunge from a – wait for it – balcony. I bet there was alcohol involved.

The slow panic sweeping Japan is continuing with the government evacuating two towns outside the so-called ‘exclusion zone’ around the Fukushima nuclear facility. The interesting thing is that all this uncertainlty over nuclear power could be causing something of a sea-change (pun!) in Japan’s attitude to power generation. Other nuclear power stations are being closed and renewable options are being sought.

You know that debate that’s been going on for a millenium about the English language suffering and dying from the influx of new words and corruption from people who can’t speak it properly? Yep – still going strong.

Hey did you hear Osama Bin Laden died? In 2001? From a Fox News article?

A very well-considered article comparing the U.S. / Middle Eastern wars to World War One. It only goes to show that history moves in cycles,  we really don’t learn from our past mistakes and self-interest always wins the day. Yes, I am repeating myself too. But like the voice in the wilderness, maybe someone will listen one day…

I’m currently reading a book called “100 Mistakes That Changed History”. It only affirms the preceding paragraph, but I did read about quite a few incidents I either didn’t know know anything about, or didn’t know much about. The auther does a very good job of placing the events into context in as short a space as possible. The short chapters also make it a good book for traveling or pondering over. Recommended.

I enjoyed this read about 25 manners every kids should know by age 9, but enjoyed reading the comments even more.

I also enjoyed this article about hunting for old Parisian brothels using a century-old guidebook. Mind you, anything with ‘perverts’ in the title is going to be read by yours truly…

There’s more but it’ll have to wait for now. Tired…

There’s been a lot going on this month. April is always busy here in Japan, plus I had my mother visit, which was great, but really filled up my weekends. So I have a pile of links and random threads to thrust upon the world-wide-web. Strap in. Take a ride.

In TV, it’s great to see that Red Dwarf will be back for another season. I hope it’s a little better than the last expedition; Back To Earth. I found that one laid on the pathos and sentiment a bit too thinckly for my tastes. I hope they get back to the energy and wit of some of the earlier seasons.

Even though the situation in the Ivory Coast has been (in one sense) resolved, I’m sure the situation there, as in a lot of combat zones, is just simmering. I noticed that fighting has flared up again along the Thai/Cambodian border.

The situation at Fukushima continues to evolve on a daily basis. Declaring the disaster zone to be as bad as Chernobyl was pretty alarming. While the situation there isn’t good, at least it is relatively under control.

A major issue in Japan this year will be the customary summer loading as everyone turns on their airconditioning. It’s not unusual for Japanese homes to have 4 or 5 units PER HOUSE as ducted airconditioning is something of a rarity. Couple that with trying to boost industrial output back to pre-earthquake levels with four missing reactors’ worth of electricity probably will mean a lot of blackouts from the system overloading. It’s interesting to see that Sony, amongst other companies, have adopted a daylight saving system to try to offset that loading. I wonder if that will lead to the eventual adoption of daylight saving here. It seems quite logical since dawn in midsummer is at about 4am. 

The numbers of people who have left Japan are quite staggering. 531,000 foreigners left Japan in the four weeks after the March 11 quake, 244,000 in the first week. I don’t know how many have returned, like some friends of mine, since the situation has calmed down. More than half of those who left had re-entry permits. It’s expected that the number of travellers during this Golden Week (starting April 29th) will be down around a quarter this year. The number of foreign visitors was down 50% in March from the year earlier. Coupled with the theme of ‘self-restraint’ running through Japan at the moment (The number of Japanese going overseas was down nearly 20% for the same time period), means it’s going to be a tough time for tourism. It is good to see some proactive Japanese doing their bit though. You do need to come here. There is much more to Japan than Tokyo.

With Australian schools losing science programs and the curriculum in general failing to deal with the country’s position at the dawn of the Asian Century,  it’s interesting to read about why Finland does so well. Hint: it involves students having a life and very little homework or standardised testing. It was interesting to read about the technology making its way into universities, although I wonder how much it is helping boost academic levels, or just giving students a way to do their social networking mid-lecture…

There’s also concern at this Easter-time of how the secularisation of the education system may bereft the new generations of contact with older culture simply because they don’t understand where the stories came from. Now, I may not be the most holy of people, but I do appreciate the value of having learned about religion, at least from a cultural and philosophical standpoint. I would support the non-prosthelatising education of chldren about all religions in order to give them the necessary background for understanding where their culture has come from. The problem is most religious eduacation in Australia is done by one Christian organisation, who see their role as a mission. That doesn’t help. I htink any religious education should (at least) include Islam, Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism and pagan religions. These form the basis of our culture and serve to help us understand the major cultures Australians may have to deal with. Ignorance boosts hatred. At least a bit of education may help people understand and tolerate each other a bit.

Go to China, catch a highly contagious AIDS-like disease?

Some cool stuff to finish with.

Here’s a neat idea for a photoset: A Girl And Her Room.

Photos of TVs At The Moment They Turn Off – I have new wallpaper.

A British cloud-chasing photographer takes awesome nature photos.

People took a lot of nice photos of the recent ‘supermoon’.

Sock Puppet Army is a new (for me) webcomic that’s great for anyone who’s worked in hospitality.

Spy satellites are really helping archaeology along.

A scientist from MIT may have created an ‘artificial leaf’ to  generate solar power at 76% efficiency. In scientific terms that’s known as ‘bloody amazing’. It’ll probably disappear, along with this highly efficient internal combustion engine.

Life on Earth may be a lot more diverse than we realised with scientists finding evidence of another domain of life (the current three are eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea. Use Google or Wikipedia you lazy sod, or just read the article)

Two words: plasma rocket.

Sherry – it’s not just for grandma any more.

The search for the mother of all languages is getting interesting.

Probably nothing much – I hope.

The rest of the world is providing some interest and entertainment – as well as a little concern. Let’s go through some recent goings on, starting with some things I’ve found concerning and troubling over the past couple of weeks.

Although many foreigners have left Japan, I am not, much for the same reasons as this guy. The cleanup is starting, but where to start? The hysteria over Fukushima continues, with the media seizing upon any vaguely sensationalist notion they can, when they really don’t need to. Papa needs a new lawnmower, I guess. I get my updates straight from the IAEA. The MEXT (Japanese government) information is available through this portal. The readings for my prefecture make for slightly amusing reading (“Non-Detectable” ad infinitum). One article postulated using thorium instead of uranium as a fuel for nuclear reactors. India are already experimenting with such devices, but having recently hit the Russians for uranium-driven reactors instead, we can wonder as to whether it really is a viable replacement or not…

Some good news from all this is that drinking red wine may protect you from the effects of radiation exposure – if you take the reservatrol from it and combine it with another chemical which you have to take BEFORE the radiation hits you… Oh well.

The crisis has definitely already started taking a toll on Japan’s auto industry.

Speaking of cars, it was interesting to read that the EU may be working to ban petrol and diesel-powered cars by 2050. Environmentally it makes sense, but the politics of such a move could get in the way…

Food. The cost of food is going up; in some cases by 50% in just a few years. For rich people it isn’t much concern, but if you’re living on less than US$2 a day like half the world’s population, it matter a great deal. Meanwhile, psychiatrists, in an effort to sell more drugs and services to a panicked population, have invented a new disorder entitled ‘orthorexia’, or ‘healthy eating disorder’. That’s right, wanting to eat healthy food is now an official anxiety requiring treatment.

In Africa, the situation in the Ivory Coast continues to teeter on the brink of full-scale war. No NATO interventions though, since they don’t have any oil. My friend, Dr. Phil Clark was interviewed recently about the situation in Sudan in the wake of the division of the country into two seperate nations.

The case for and against going into the Libya was a forgone conclusion as soon as the UN gave its go-ahead to no-fly zones, even though no-one was really quite sure what this all meant. Afterwards came stories of NATO bombing rebels and civilians – it’s always the civilians who bear the worst of the pain in any ‘humanitarian intervention’, right Iraq? Afghanistan? Pakistan? Now it looks headed for a stalemate, which will make it all drag on for months. Look for calls for the US to send in the troops – especially if Al Qaeda gets mentioned enough times, or the rebels end up being not so revolutionary. (“Just as long as they are our kind of revolutionary”) Obama’s rhetoric was seen as having a little too much of the George W’s about it – by (shock! horror!) Fox News. Do you think they’re finally catching on that Obama is really just another neo-liberal neo-con in disguise? Me neither, but Sarah Palin did.

Meanwhile, uprisings continue in Syria. Somewhere in a place called Afghanistan a guy named Karzai asked the US and NATO to leave the country.

At the same time – right at this moment – Bradley Manning is still in solitary confinement. Obama supports this ongoing torture of a US citizen, and the implications are profound for all of us who believe in free speech and basic human rights.

Australia is getting those cancer-causing airport full-body scanner machines – but with the promise that they won’t be the ‘naked’ types currently used in the US. I’m sure my growing melanoma will appreciate the privacy.

Yeah, it’s been a while. Apologies if you’ve been hanging out with baited breath for another ramble from my addled brain and journeys around the web.

The net is a wondrous way to spend hours, and hours, and hours of time. Truly a most splendid timewaster has never been seen before in civilization. So wide-ranging in its variety, so deep the level to which it can sink. It has truly brought the world together and at the same time has come to be a substitute for it for so many of us.

Allow me to share and continue to keep alive in some small way a few sparkly gems found along the road most travelled over the past few weeks.

I’ll make no secret of the fact that I find Asian women most attractive. Living in Japan just stepping onto the local train or taking a short trip is cause for celelbration in that my eyes always find something to appreciate. It’s also no secret on the Net that many of my fellow human beings have also found much to enjoy in the Japanese female form. Indeed the fetishists of this country and other have found much else to do as well. The schoolgirl fetish is one I can easily understand – and much has been made of it in this country, from the mainstream such as TV dramas and magazines, through to the more extreme perversions known to the human imagination. One interesting thing that surfaced of late was the Japanese media recently proclaimed that the sexiest school uniforms in the world were those of Thai university students. In the words of the Virgin Mary, come again? Well, it seems, that in a country where young women are forced to wear uniforms at tertiary level, they’ve taken it upon themselves to express their budding sexuality and individuality by pushing the limits of public decency. From time to time the Thai media reports that a crackdown on these uniforms is under way. From the regularity that this seems to happen, it doesn’t look like these crackdowns last very long, or are particularly succeessful. This post contains a couple of videos that illustrate the phenomenon in more detail – for research purposes, naturally. You may see a post surface on my sister blog that I’m off to Thailand again before too long… for research purposes, naturally.

 In Japan, the almighty Sega Corporation have devised a game system for men’s urinals. The article goes into each game in quite some detail, but there’s no word yet on when or where they’re likely to pop up.

When I was eight, I enjoyed digging holes in our back yard. Trust the Japanese to make an official competition out of it, complete with cash prizes and a ‘Golden Shovel’ to take home.

Speaking of Japan, for anyone who’s ever thought about visiting here, you have to be up to speed with the culture of napping that’s everywhere here.

And speaking of when I was eight, I enjoyed eating Vegemite. I still do – in fact this morning’s breakfast consisted of the Aussie classic, Vegemite on toast. Striking another blow against childhood is the advent of ‘Vegemite For Kids’. Hey, Vegemite IS for kids – sodium or no sodium. By the way, the body NEEDS salt. It’s not like the previous generations (plural) who were raised on regular, salt-infused Vegemite are all keeling over from heart disease. Another nail in the coffin of the death of childhood. ‘Health experts’, go jump in front of a large, heavy, speeding truck.

I did have a chuckle at this, and I hope Mark Knopfler did too. In Canada, the political-correctness-Nazi-patrol have done their number on the classic Dire Straits song, “Money For Nothing” since it contains the word ‘faggot’. It not has to be removed for airplay in Canada. They’re only 26 years late. 26 years. Blimey, what a hoot!

A storyboard artist for Dreamworks like to draw ninjas on his days off – a hobby I can get behind. He also knocks out kick-ass comics where Carl Sagan blasts the forces of superstition and myth out of the cosmos with the power of the Scientific Method. Love it.

The Oatmeal is also full of welcome advice and comments on daily life, like this.

I have a big heart for photography. I love the way anyone can take a simple device and make beautiful images with it.

Here are some amazing long exposure photgraphs.

And here are some very clever photographs of people levitating, along with helpful explanations of how they were done.

Maybe with practice I could capture a whole day in a single shot…. maybe not.

This is a wonderful idea: recreating photographs years later, with the same models, clothes, locations and poses.

The Cracked website can help along as well, but with an added dash of WTF to make things interesting.

I cam across this article through I Heart Chaos (in itself a wondrous site) about an American photographer named Vivian Maier. Her photographs were never seen by anyone by her – and were nearly lost forever until they were rescued by a collector with an astute eye. Now he is steadily sharing her incredible photographs with the world.

Here’s a list of ten women who made cinematic history. Excellent reading.

I recently went to Norway, which was an incredible experience. I thoroughly recommend it. Next time I go to Scandinavia I might have to find myself in Sweden for a while. The science nerd in me wants to see all the parts of the world’s largest scale model of the solar system. It would be quite a road trip though. I might need a couple of months… oh gee dang, what a shame…

I am enjoying the recent surge in ‘manliness’, ‘male pride’, whatever you want to call it. It’s probably something to do with the lack of a meaningful father-figure in my life. I do like the idea of these websites promoting and encouraging a place for men to share, discuss and encourage each other to be the best men they can be. I also like the way that this is being done without being opposed to other roles in society. We need all roles to make society work, and men are an integral part of that. I’m getting a lot out of ‘The Art Of Manliness” website, and am enjoying clicking away from it as well. Some of the style links are interesting, even though I sometimes don’t agree with what they recommend. The age of the Fedora is over – sadly.

In weird movie news, here’s one about space Nazis coming back to invade Earth.

In conspiracy theory madness, have you heard about how Denver International Airport was designed with all sorts of evil supernatural symbols embedded in it?

Speaking of the end of the world though, we also have asteroids coming for us in 2036, as well as more Icelandic volcanoes threatening to explode, along with Yellowstone’s caldera, so the news should be entertaining for quite a while to come. There’s also junk food lowering our IQs, the fact that language is dying, thanks to the internet and mobile phones, as well as children preferring their virtual lives to their real ones. Oh and Sarah and Bristol Palin are trying to trademark their names. But we can all take solace from the Church of the Latter Day Dude

Science news. The world’s most powerful optical microscope may be able to see viruses, as well as break the laws of physics. That’s one heck of a nerdgasm.

The Kepler Space Telescope continues to push back the boundaries of what we know about the universe, such as finding planets orbiting stars at incredible speeds, or in the same orbits.

Not quite Science, but here’s five things that were invented by Donald Duck.

Read how a homeowner was able to foreclose on his bank. You read that right.

Ah, Internet, how I love thee…

Another perspective on the recent goings on between the USA, South Korea and North Korea, with a good summary of the past fifteen years or so in diplomacy between these countries.

Japan’s looking at introducing an environment tax, because generating revenue will save the world. Yeah, that’ll sell… One of Japan’s most respected business leaders has put an ‘X’ on the spot of the problem with this once great country – weak leadership.

Australian households have reduced their water usage by 16% over the past five years, but are paying up to 95% more for it.

Leslie Nielsen passed away recently. Flying High (Airplane) is very likely in my all-time top ten. It certainly is one of the most quotable movies of all time.

Cancer isn’t slowing Christopher Hitchens down.

The newest touchscreens are looking even cooler than the ‘old’ ones.

The guy who invented Netscape is back with a new internet browser. I think I might give it a try…

Boeing are able to mass-produce solar cells with an efficiency of 39.2% (That’s VERY good, by the way)

New broadband technologies are looking interesting.

New drone and surveillance technologies are not.

Not to worry, since the planet is doomed anyway.

Louisiana gives a middle finger to meddling Creationists.

How books are made.

How students pass university by never writing papers or essays.

A good idea for creating good future citizens.

McDonalds and PespiCo are helping to write UK health policy. Giving arsonists the keys to the fire brigade? Smart move!

Silvio Berlusconi’s defense against having an affair with an underage pole dancer? “At least I’m not gay. Oh, and the Mafia is out to get me.” Yeah, that’ll work.

Enjoy that chocolate (fatty) since cocoa may become a rare extravagance within the next few years.

Not to worry, since maid trains are now available in Japan, and the bras are very welcoming to visitors too. There are still some good reasons to live here though, although anime is on the decline.

Giant sushi is making appearances at an airport carousel near you… well… near me, actually.

That Siberian methane is bubbling away, and looking to create a desert. The coal miners are looking to do the same thing, in their own way.

Australian cities are threatening to destroy themselves, by spreading themselves too thin.

Beer helped make civilization.

The oldest ground-edge stone tool in the world has been found in Arnhem Land, at the north end of Australia.

The greatest mural ever. I want one.

And my upcoming trip to Scandinavia promises to be cold – as in I’ll likely be getting that White Christmas experience I’ve always wanted.