I watched John Pilger’s most recent documentary, “The War You Don’t See” today.

As always, John Pilger takes the viewer through a topic of important relevance to the life and freedom of all of us who live in Western Democracies. In this case it is the role of information, journalism and war in shaping our values and attitudes. The active collusion between the military and the news corporations is explored by Pilger. However a large proportion of the film also focusses on the victims of such policies: the citizens of the countries who are attacked, as well as the journalists who have been killed, sometimes by the same military they’ve been sent to cover. It is certainly harrowing viewing at times. The footage and dexcriptions of horrors by those who were there remain a lingering memory.

It is certainly the war you don’t see, and Pilger prefaces such footage and episodes by repeating the title screen in order to drive home his point.

I would say this documentary should be necessary viewing by all citizens who want to make truly balanced and well-informed decisions about what they decide to believe, as well as by journalists who should know better than to simply tow the line when it comes to reporting what governments tell them to.

Buy the DVD or watch for free any way you can.

 

Pilger was supposed to be presenting his film in the United States at an event sponsored by the Lannan Foundation, a very prominent liberal organisation, on June 15th. However, his appearance and the screening of the film was cancelled unexpectedly at the order of Patrick Lannan. Lannan has not offered any reason for the cancellation.

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Greetings and salutations.

So the huge controversy in Australia seems to be over this thing called ‘planking’. It’s when you pose like a plank in photos. The more unusual the setting, the better. I first read about it in ‘The Age’ since it’s about the only major newspaper in Australia that’s not Murdoch-owned. The initial article (which has since disappeared from the website) played up the fun aspect while the moderators of the associated Facebook page made sure to mention that saftey was a priority. Naturally, within three days, there has been an arrest for planking on a police car, and the first death involving a plunge from a – wait for it – balcony. I bet there was alcohol involved.

The slow panic sweeping Japan is continuing with the government evacuating two towns outside the so-called ‘exclusion zone’ around the Fukushima nuclear facility. The interesting thing is that all this uncertainlty over nuclear power could be causing something of a sea-change (pun!) in Japan’s attitude to power generation. Other nuclear power stations are being closed and renewable options are being sought.

You know that debate that’s been going on for a millenium about the English language suffering and dying from the influx of new words and corruption from people who can’t speak it properly? Yep – still going strong.

Hey did you hear Osama Bin Laden died? In 2001? From a Fox News article?

A very well-considered article comparing the U.S. / Middle Eastern wars to World War One. It only goes to show that history moves in cycles,  we really don’t learn from our past mistakes and self-interest always wins the day. Yes, I am repeating myself too. But like the voice in the wilderness, maybe someone will listen one day…

I’m currently reading a book called “100 Mistakes That Changed History”. It only affirms the preceding paragraph, but I did read about quite a few incidents I either didn’t know know anything about, or didn’t know much about. The auther does a very good job of placing the events into context in as short a space as possible. The short chapters also make it a good book for traveling or pondering over. Recommended.

I enjoyed this read about 25 manners every kids should know by age 9, but enjoyed reading the comments even more.

I also enjoyed this article about hunting for old Parisian brothels using a century-old guidebook. Mind you, anything with ‘perverts’ in the title is going to be read by yours truly…

There’s more but it’ll have to wait for now. Tired…

Just when the world went and got itself a dose of healthy optimism with a royal wedding (despite what you think about it, at least it was a positive news story), it had to turn back to darkness with the death of Osama Bin Laden. There was a Martin Luther King misquote that got started on Twitter and made its way to Facebook very quickly. Although I agreed with the sentiment expressed in the (mis)quote, it’s worth reading through this article on science hoaxes to put it into context.

Of course the conspiracy theories began swirling around, almost before Bin Laden’s body met the inky depths of the ocean. One word that has been used a fair bit by the US Government, as well as bandied about on the internet is ‘justice’. This old-world, wild west notion of justice concerns me, as it does a number of people. Despite Bin Laden’s alleged links to 9/11, extrajudicial killings are illegal under international law. The US government is shimming and shamming its way out of it by saying he tried to defend himself but reports are coming out (from sources such as Bin Laden’s daughter who was present during the raid) that Bin Laden was unarmed, taken alive, then executed by the special forces. They’re also claiming that he was an enemy combatant, so it was justified, but he was an international criminal, not a soldier. The legal linguistic gymnastics look set to continue for while to come. The sea of information and disinformation also looks set to widen and deepen, so what truth there is to the situation looks set to be lost anyway. I am not confident we will ever really know the truth about this.

One thing is certain, Bin Laden is going to be very much a prescence in US foreign policy for a long time to come. His assassination certainly played into his hands, and his legacy is certain to continue into the future. Geoffrey Robertson hit it right on the head, as usual, and Tom Engelhardt is always good to read for an insight into the bigger picture.

Oh, and it’s worth repeating, but you you’re really interested to know what the US government thinks about truth and free speech, then look at what happened to Ray McGovern. He was arrested and beaten up by security thugs for staging a silent protest at a Hillary Clinton speech – the one where she defended the right to free speech in Egypt, but obviously not to Americans – especially in a plutocracy. Oh, and Mr. McGovern used to work for the CIA.

That whole Libya thing is looking dodgier and dodgier by the day. Not so much about bringing peace and democracy and about getting their hands on (surprise!) oil, Libya’s sovereign funds as well as those funds to rebuild the pulverized country.

How’s that Guantanamo place going? Still a bastion of degradation and ongoing torture? Good… nothing to see here. Oh, and how’s Bradley Manning, by the way? Being treated as a citizen of the US..? No? Oh, how about as a human bei…. No? How about as an animal? No? Worse than that? Oh – nothing’s changed then. Congrats Obama, you’re a monster in my book. If they can’t schedule a war crimes trial for George W., maybe they will for you.

And since the next US election isn’t until next November, it’s time for the pundits to start lining up. One thing for sure is that the Republicans are going to make American Decline their theme, somehow trying to avoid bringing up that it happened on the watch of the last Republican president. How are they going to do that? Well, for a start, by bringing up as many crazy early candidates as they can, so by the time they get around to choosing someone seriously, they’ll look quite sane in comparison. Johann Hari’s excellent article in The Independent sums up the situation most elegantly. I love the opening paragraph, so I’ll quote it in full for you:

Since the election of Barack Obama, the Republican Party has proved that one of its central intellectual arguments was right all along. It has long claimed that evolution is a myth believed in only by whiny liberals – and it turns out it was on to something. Every six months, the party venerates a new hero, and each time it is somebody further back on the evolutionary scale.

Fatsen your seatbelts, it’s going to be a looong ride – maybe not so bumpy, but hopefully entertaining.

The last combat veteran of World War One has passed away. Claude Choules served with the Royal Navy in WW1 then for Australia in WW2. He passed away aged 110. There is one more veteran of the war left, a British woman, Florence Green, who served in a non-combat capacity. She is also 110. We shall remember them.

Of course the idea of ANZAC Day is remember the fallen and to hope for no more wars. It is not to continue Australia’s role as a supplicant to the USA. Australia’s current prime minister, who is starting to look more and more like John Howard as the days pass, may well have been installed to continue US interests. Just who are we serving?

Not each other, according to this article. It made me sad to think of returning to Australia…

Australia’s not the only country joining the ranks of the Bush copycats. I see Canada has now joined the ranks.

As the situation in Fukushima continues, it’s worthwhile remembering the world’s worst nuclear reactor disaster in Chernobyl. Here’s a piece about one of the photographers who went in to document the disaster in the midst of deadly radiation.

Skynet is with us, but don’t worry, those HD cameras are great for taking footage of surfing….

China’s economy is still growing strong, and it looks set to overtake the US in as soon as 2016 according to the IMF.

But, we’re running out of stuff. Not only are we running out of manual typewriters, we’re also running out of oil; not only the black stuff, but the oil we need to eat. We’re also running short of food, fresh water, helium, chocolate, medical isotopes, tequila and phosphorus. Stuff like tequila and chocolate we could probably reluctantly get used to, but no medical istopes means no cancer treatments, no phosphorus means no food, and no water, well, that’s pretty obvious.

With the buzzword being ‘cloud computing’ these days, it’s worthwhile thinking about the possibility of hackers having a field day, or perhaps they already are, right Sony?

An English teacher working in Australia won a case against unfair dismissal recently. That’s a good thing, especially when you consider his ‘crime’ was to teach a class of adults on the correct use of the ‘F’ word. In my opinion, if you’re going to participate fully in Australian society, a comprehensive knowledge of when to use – and not use – that word should be mandatory! 

Yahoo calls out the ten most overrated tourist destinations and, more importantly, gives alternatives. Some of  these I had absolutely no intention at all of going to, but it’s good to learn about other places that are equally awesome. You might also want to check out the site at Angkor Wat before it disappears under the heels of a million tourists. I went there a couple of years ago and aside from the central complex and Angkor, I’d recommend you take a few days and see the other temples around the area; there are far fewer tourists, fewer pedlars, often better preserved architecture, and a chance to help the locals more by shopping where they shop.

So when is a kilo not a kilo?

Einstein’s theories have been proved, yet again.

A list of names for things you knew had a name but didn’t know what they were.

One of the interesting things about living in an information age is that one simply doesn’t have to die. It is the stuff of science fiction to transpose one’s personality into a computer and to continue ‘living’ as a machine, but in the past, in order to achieve immortality one had to be a Hemingway or a Shakespeare, a Monroe or a Dean, a Warhol or a Picasso. Now, thanks to the available technology, our writings, videos, music and musings can live as long as the server permits. I came across this blog post, of one Derek Miller, who recently died from cancer. It is a marvellous, poignant and inspiring piece of prose. Even though the man is dead, his work can live forever, and thereby so can he. What an age we live in!

Enjoy it while you can.

There’s been a lot going on this month. April is always busy here in Japan, plus I had my mother visit, which was great, but really filled up my weekends. So I have a pile of links and random threads to thrust upon the world-wide-web. Strap in. Take a ride.

In TV, it’s great to see that Red Dwarf will be back for another season. I hope it’s a little better than the last expedition; Back To Earth. I found that one laid on the pathos and sentiment a bit too thinckly for my tastes. I hope they get back to the energy and wit of some of the earlier seasons.

Even though the situation in the Ivory Coast has been (in one sense) resolved, I’m sure the situation there, as in a lot of combat zones, is just simmering. I noticed that fighting has flared up again along the Thai/Cambodian border.

The situation at Fukushima continues to evolve on a daily basis. Declaring the disaster zone to be as bad as Chernobyl was pretty alarming. While the situation there isn’t good, at least it is relatively under control.

A major issue in Japan this year will be the customary summer loading as everyone turns on their airconditioning. It’s not unusual for Japanese homes to have 4 or 5 units PER HOUSE as ducted airconditioning is something of a rarity. Couple that with trying to boost industrial output back to pre-earthquake levels with four missing reactors’ worth of electricity probably will mean a lot of blackouts from the system overloading. It’s interesting to see that Sony, amongst other companies, have adopted a daylight saving system to try to offset that loading. I wonder if that will lead to the eventual adoption of daylight saving here. It seems quite logical since dawn in midsummer is at about 4am. 

The numbers of people who have left Japan are quite staggering. 531,000 foreigners left Japan in the four weeks after the March 11 quake, 244,000 in the first week. I don’t know how many have returned, like some friends of mine, since the situation has calmed down. More than half of those who left had re-entry permits. It’s expected that the number of travellers during this Golden Week (starting April 29th) will be down around a quarter this year. The number of foreign visitors was down 50% in March from the year earlier. Coupled with the theme of ‘self-restraint’ running through Japan at the moment (The number of Japanese going overseas was down nearly 20% for the same time period), means it’s going to be a tough time for tourism. It is good to see some proactive Japanese doing their bit though. You do need to come here. There is much more to Japan than Tokyo.

With Australian schools losing science programs and the curriculum in general failing to deal with the country’s position at the dawn of the Asian Century,  it’s interesting to read about why Finland does so well. Hint: it involves students having a life and very little homework or standardised testing. It was interesting to read about the technology making its way into universities, although I wonder how much it is helping boost academic levels, or just giving students a way to do their social networking mid-lecture…

There’s also concern at this Easter-time of how the secularisation of the education system may bereft the new generations of contact with older culture simply because they don’t understand where the stories came from. Now, I may not be the most holy of people, but I do appreciate the value of having learned about religion, at least from a cultural and philosophical standpoint. I would support the non-prosthelatising education of chldren about all religions in order to give them the necessary background for understanding where their culture has come from. The problem is most religious eduacation in Australia is done by one Christian organisation, who see their role as a mission. That doesn’t help. I htink any religious education should (at least) include Islam, Judaism, Christianity, Buddhism and pagan religions. These form the basis of our culture and serve to help us understand the major cultures Australians may have to deal with. Ignorance boosts hatred. At least a bit of education may help people understand and tolerate each other a bit.

Go to China, catch a highly contagious AIDS-like disease?

Some cool stuff to finish with.

Here’s a neat idea for a photoset: A Girl And Her Room.

Photos of TVs At The Moment They Turn Off – I have new wallpaper.

A British cloud-chasing photographer takes awesome nature photos.

People took a lot of nice photos of the recent ‘supermoon’.

Sock Puppet Army is a new (for me) webcomic that’s great for anyone who’s worked in hospitality.

Spy satellites are really helping archaeology along.

A scientist from MIT may have created an ‘artificial leaf’ to  generate solar power at 76% efficiency. In scientific terms that’s known as ‘bloody amazing’. It’ll probably disappear, along with this highly efficient internal combustion engine.

Life on Earth may be a lot more diverse than we realised with scientists finding evidence of another domain of life (the current three are eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea. Use Google or Wikipedia you lazy sod, or just read the article)

Two words: plasma rocket.

Sherry – it’s not just for grandma any more.

The search for the mother of all languages is getting interesting.

Probably nothing much – I hope.

The rest of the world is providing some interest and entertainment – as well as a little concern. Let’s go through some recent goings on, starting with some things I’ve found concerning and troubling over the past couple of weeks.

Although many foreigners have left Japan, I am not, much for the same reasons as this guy. The cleanup is starting, but where to start? The hysteria over Fukushima continues, with the media seizing upon any vaguely sensationalist notion they can, when they really don’t need to. Papa needs a new lawnmower, I guess. I get my updates straight from the IAEA. The MEXT (Japanese government) information is available through this portal. The readings for my prefecture make for slightly amusing reading (“Non-Detectable” ad infinitum). One article postulated using thorium instead of uranium as a fuel for nuclear reactors. India are already experimenting with such devices, but having recently hit the Russians for uranium-driven reactors instead, we can wonder as to whether it really is a viable replacement or not…

Some good news from all this is that drinking red wine may protect you from the effects of radiation exposure – if you take the reservatrol from it and combine it with another chemical which you have to take BEFORE the radiation hits you… Oh well.

The crisis has definitely already started taking a toll on Japan’s auto industry.

Speaking of cars, it was interesting to read that the EU may be working to ban petrol and diesel-powered cars by 2050. Environmentally it makes sense, but the politics of such a move could get in the way…

Food. The cost of food is going up; in some cases by 50% in just a few years. For rich people it isn’t much concern, but if you’re living on less than US$2 a day like half the world’s population, it matter a great deal. Meanwhile, psychiatrists, in an effort to sell more drugs and services to a panicked population, have invented a new disorder entitled ‘orthorexia’, or ‘healthy eating disorder’. That’s right, wanting to eat healthy food is now an official anxiety requiring treatment.

In Africa, the situation in the Ivory Coast continues to teeter on the brink of full-scale war. No NATO interventions though, since they don’t have any oil. My friend, Dr. Phil Clark was interviewed recently about the situation in Sudan in the wake of the division of the country into two seperate nations.

The case for and against going into the Libya was a forgone conclusion as soon as the UN gave its go-ahead to no-fly zones, even though no-one was really quite sure what this all meant. Afterwards came stories of NATO bombing rebels and civilians – it’s always the civilians who bear the worst of the pain in any ‘humanitarian intervention’, right Iraq? Afghanistan? Pakistan? Now it looks headed for a stalemate, which will make it all drag on for months. Look for calls for the US to send in the troops – especially if Al Qaeda gets mentioned enough times, or the rebels end up being not so revolutionary. (“Just as long as they are our kind of revolutionary”) Obama’s rhetoric was seen as having a little too much of the George W’s about it – by (shock! horror!) Fox News. Do you think they’re finally catching on that Obama is really just another neo-liberal neo-con in disguise? Me neither, but Sarah Palin did.

Meanwhile, uprisings continue in Syria. Somewhere in a place called Afghanistan a guy named Karzai asked the US and NATO to leave the country.

At the same time – right at this moment – Bradley Manning is still in solitary confinement. Obama supports this ongoing torture of a US citizen, and the implications are profound for all of us who believe in free speech and basic human rights.

Australia is getting those cancer-causing airport full-body scanner machines – but with the promise that they won’t be the ‘naked’ types currently used in the US. I’m sure my growing melanoma will appreciate the privacy.

I’m still making sense out of all the events around the country over the past week. Japan has started the process of recovery from the worst earthquake disaster in recent history. Events are still unfolding, especially relating to the crisis at the nuclear power plants along the eastern coast of Japan. Hopefully that situation will not fulfill the doomsayers’ prophecies of nuclear disaster.

I want to share a few things I’ve found along the way: some moving, some interesting, some outright awful. It sometimes takes a crisis to bring out the best and worst of humanity, and this disaster has truly seen some of them. Some of them I will link to, but others I will not – like the forums where people claimed the earthquake and tsunami were somehow retribution for Pearl Harbor. Scum that low doesn’t deserve attention.

Very quickly, the usual suspects have claimed that somehow God is punishing Japan for some pet hate or other; Rush Limbaugh, Glenn Beck etc. Some of the more interesting morons have turned out to be the captain of the Sea Shepherd and Tokyo’s right-wing governor, Shintaro Ishihara, have both claimed that the quake was divine retribution – something that otherwise they have nothing in common. To his (small) credit, Ishihara withdrew his comments – probably after realising it was career suicide. 

This post from I Heart Chaos showed two very moving videos. The first almost moved me to punch the screen as it shows a right-wing Christian fundamentalist teenage nutjob praising her god for granting an answer for her prayers to smits athiests by unleashing his power on Japan. I will try to curtail my rage (I watched less than a minute of the video before stopping it, such was my rising fury at this …. person) and try to explain her outburst as the inevitable result of being raised in a cult that suppresses the connection we have to all humanity through implicit superiority, entitlement and racist doctrines. She simply has no idea how offensive her words are because she hasn’t been taught how. In my opinion this is a classic example of sociopathy and a very good reason to avoid religions at all costs.

The second video almost moved me to tears as two boys from Haiti (Remember the Haiti earthquake from last year? Their situation is still dire.) watch the unfolding tsunami on live TV. One of the boys is reduced to tears as he expresses his helplessness at being unable to help the people being swept the their deaths, or to comfort the survivors. Boys like that fill me with hope for humanity – that we can still feel such a strong connection to strangers around the world simply because of what we share in common.

There are some links to before and after photos if you want to see just how devastating the tsunami was.

Thankfully, most peoples’ thoughts immediately turned to ideas along the lines of, “What can I do to help?” Mine did too. The truth is that at this time, help would be best left to the professionals. Many countries, such as South Korea, Australia, the USA and New Zealand, have sent in teams of trained rescue workers to assist the Japanese rescue teams, Self Defence Forces, medical, police and fire crews who are working around the clock to find survivors, but sadly, mostly finding bodies. The reserve of the Self Defence Forces have also been called up – for the first time since it was created in 1954.

Send money. The Red Cross would be my recommendation, but there are other ways to donate as well. My guess is requests for clothes, toys and other things will come as soon as they’re able to take care of the basics. It’s still very cold up north – we had snow here yesterday – so they’re trying to move as much fuel and warm things into the area, as well as restore power, as fast as they can.

An example of what’s going on is with the US relief mission, titled “Operation Tomodachi” (‘tomodachi’ means ‘friend’ in Japanese). Scroll past the ads and links to smutty material to see screencaps from Japanese TV of the effort, as well as an example of what the Japanese civilian effort is doing. The picture shows how they were able to repair an earthquake damaged road in just a few days. The infrastructure is what’s really needed right now to get supplies into the region, so that’s where the effort is right now.

Another thing that is happening is the world’s attention has also been turned to the way that the Japanese people handle a crisis – with calmness and order being the highest priority to maintain. Some have expressed, in hushed awe, their wonder at the lack of looting or rioting that would happen in their own countries. This article explains the character of the Japanese people in some detail and why such behaviour just wouldn’t occur to most people here.

One thing is clear, that life in the Tohoku region of Japan will never be the same again. Some towns have lost over half of their populations. Just compare that to where you live – if in a matter of minutes over half of the people around you just died.

The rebuilding will take years. BUT – never underestimate the strength and determination of the Japanese people.

I came to Japan just six years after the last devasting earthquake here; the Hanshin-Awaji earthquake of January 1995. One of the first things I did was to visit Kobe, and I had to confess it was difficult to find evidence that there had ever been an earthquake there. I think I saw a few patched up cracks in one building and a lopsided gutter on a road. That was it.

Japanese society has been well prepared and well rehearsed for such disasters; one of the lessons learnt from the aftermath of the 1995 quake – although the sheer scale of this earthquake and tsunami would have to fall into ‘worst case scenario’ in many ways.

Like I said, life will never be the same again. But Japan will pull through. Of that, I am sure.

Yeah, it’s been a while. Apologies if you’ve been hanging out with baited breath for another ramble from my addled brain and journeys around the web.

The net is a wondrous way to spend hours, and hours, and hours of time. Truly a most splendid timewaster has never been seen before in civilization. So wide-ranging in its variety, so deep the level to which it can sink. It has truly brought the world together and at the same time has come to be a substitute for it for so many of us.

Allow me to share and continue to keep alive in some small way a few sparkly gems found along the road most travelled over the past few weeks.

I’ll make no secret of the fact that I find Asian women most attractive. Living in Japan just stepping onto the local train or taking a short trip is cause for celelbration in that my eyes always find something to appreciate. It’s also no secret on the Net that many of my fellow human beings have also found much to enjoy in the Japanese female form. Indeed the fetishists of this country and other have found much else to do as well. The schoolgirl fetish is one I can easily understand – and much has been made of it in this country, from the mainstream such as TV dramas and magazines, through to the more extreme perversions known to the human imagination. One interesting thing that surfaced of late was the Japanese media recently proclaimed that the sexiest school uniforms in the world were those of Thai university students. In the words of the Virgin Mary, come again? Well, it seems, that in a country where young women are forced to wear uniforms at tertiary level, they’ve taken it upon themselves to express their budding sexuality and individuality by pushing the limits of public decency. From time to time the Thai media reports that a crackdown on these uniforms is under way. From the regularity that this seems to happen, it doesn’t look like these crackdowns last very long, or are particularly succeessful. This post contains a couple of videos that illustrate the phenomenon in more detail – for research purposes, naturally. You may see a post surface on my sister blog that I’m off to Thailand again before too long… for research purposes, naturally.

 In Japan, the almighty Sega Corporation have devised a game system for men’s urinals. The article goes into each game in quite some detail, but there’s no word yet on when or where they’re likely to pop up.

When I was eight, I enjoyed digging holes in our back yard. Trust the Japanese to make an official competition out of it, complete with cash prizes and a ‘Golden Shovel’ to take home.

Speaking of Japan, for anyone who’s ever thought about visiting here, you have to be up to speed with the culture of napping that’s everywhere here.

And speaking of when I was eight, I enjoyed eating Vegemite. I still do – in fact this morning’s breakfast consisted of the Aussie classic, Vegemite on toast. Striking another blow against childhood is the advent of ‘Vegemite For Kids’. Hey, Vegemite IS for kids – sodium or no sodium. By the way, the body NEEDS salt. It’s not like the previous generations (plural) who were raised on regular, salt-infused Vegemite are all keeling over from heart disease. Another nail in the coffin of the death of childhood. ‘Health experts’, go jump in front of a large, heavy, speeding truck.

I did have a chuckle at this, and I hope Mark Knopfler did too. In Canada, the political-correctness-Nazi-patrol have done their number on the classic Dire Straits song, “Money For Nothing” since it contains the word ‘faggot’. It not has to be removed for airplay in Canada. They’re only 26 years late. 26 years. Blimey, what a hoot!

A storyboard artist for Dreamworks like to draw ninjas on his days off – a hobby I can get behind. He also knocks out kick-ass comics where Carl Sagan blasts the forces of superstition and myth out of the cosmos with the power of the Scientific Method. Love it.

The Oatmeal is also full of welcome advice and comments on daily life, like this.

I have a big heart for photography. I love the way anyone can take a simple device and make beautiful images with it.

Here are some amazing long exposure photgraphs.

And here are some very clever photographs of people levitating, along with helpful explanations of how they were done.

Maybe with practice I could capture a whole day in a single shot…. maybe not.

This is a wonderful idea: recreating photographs years later, with the same models, clothes, locations and poses.

The Cracked website can help along as well, but with an added dash of WTF to make things interesting.

I cam across this article through I Heart Chaos (in itself a wondrous site) about an American photographer named Vivian Maier. Her photographs were never seen by anyone by her – and were nearly lost forever until they were rescued by a collector with an astute eye. Now he is steadily sharing her incredible photographs with the world.

Here’s a list of ten women who made cinematic history. Excellent reading.

I recently went to Norway, which was an incredible experience. I thoroughly recommend it. Next time I go to Scandinavia I might have to find myself in Sweden for a while. The science nerd in me wants to see all the parts of the world’s largest scale model of the solar system. It would be quite a road trip though. I might need a couple of months… oh gee dang, what a shame…

I am enjoying the recent surge in ‘manliness’, ‘male pride’, whatever you want to call it. It’s probably something to do with the lack of a meaningful father-figure in my life. I do like the idea of these websites promoting and encouraging a place for men to share, discuss and encourage each other to be the best men they can be. I also like the way that this is being done without being opposed to other roles in society. We need all roles to make society work, and men are an integral part of that. I’m getting a lot out of ‘The Art Of Manliness” website, and am enjoying clicking away from it as well. Some of the style links are interesting, even though I sometimes don’t agree with what they recommend. The age of the Fedora is over – sadly.

In weird movie news, here’s one about space Nazis coming back to invade Earth.

In conspiracy theory madness, have you heard about how Denver International Airport was designed with all sorts of evil supernatural symbols embedded in it?

Speaking of the end of the world though, we also have asteroids coming for us in 2036, as well as more Icelandic volcanoes threatening to explode, along with Yellowstone’s caldera, so the news should be entertaining for quite a while to come. There’s also junk food lowering our IQs, the fact that language is dying, thanks to the internet and mobile phones, as well as children preferring their virtual lives to their real ones. Oh and Sarah and Bristol Palin are trying to trademark their names. But we can all take solace from the Church of the Latter Day Dude

Science news. The world’s most powerful optical microscope may be able to see viruses, as well as break the laws of physics. That’s one heck of a nerdgasm.

The Kepler Space Telescope continues to push back the boundaries of what we know about the universe, such as finding planets orbiting stars at incredible speeds, or in the same orbits.

Not quite Science, but here’s five things that were invented by Donald Duck.

Read how a homeowner was able to foreclose on his bank. You read that right.

Ah, Internet, how I love thee…