Probably nothing much – I hope.

The rest of the world is providing some interest and entertainment – as well as a little concern. Let’s go through some recent goings on, starting with some things I’ve found concerning and troubling over the past couple of weeks.

Although many foreigners have left Japan, I am not, much for the same reasons as this guy. The cleanup is starting, but where to start? The hysteria over Fukushima continues, with the media seizing upon any vaguely sensationalist notion they can, when they really don’t need to. Papa needs a new lawnmower, I guess. I get my updates straight from the IAEA. The MEXT (Japanese government) information is available through this portal. The readings for my prefecture make for slightly amusing reading (“Non-Detectable” ad infinitum). One article postulated using thorium instead of uranium as a fuel for nuclear reactors. India are already experimenting with such devices, but having recently hit the Russians for uranium-driven reactors instead, we can wonder as to whether it really is a viable replacement or not…

Some good news from all this is that drinking red wine may protect you from the effects of radiation exposure – if you take the reservatrol from it and combine it with another chemical which you have to take BEFORE the radiation hits you… Oh well.

The crisis has definitely already started taking a toll on Japan’s auto industry.

Speaking of cars, it was interesting to read that the EU may be working to ban petrol and diesel-powered cars by 2050. Environmentally it makes sense, but the politics of such a move could get in the way…

Food. The cost of food is going up; in some cases by 50% in just a few years. For rich people it isn’t much concern, but if you’re living on less than US$2 a day like half the world’s population, it matter a great deal. Meanwhile, psychiatrists, in an effort to sell more drugs and services to a panicked population, have invented a new disorder entitled ‘orthorexia’, or ‘healthy eating disorder’. That’s right, wanting to eat healthy food is now an official anxiety requiring treatment.

In Africa, the situation in the Ivory Coast continues to teeter on the brink of full-scale war. No NATO interventions though, since they don’t have any oil. My friend, Dr. Phil Clark was interviewed recently about the situation in Sudan in the wake of the division of the country into two seperate nations.

The case for and against going into the Libya was a forgone conclusion as soon as the UN gave its go-ahead to no-fly zones, even though no-one was really quite sure what this all meant. Afterwards came stories of NATO bombing rebels and civilians – it’s always the civilians who bear the worst of the pain in any ‘humanitarian intervention’, right Iraq? Afghanistan? Pakistan? Now it looks headed for a stalemate, which will make it all drag on for months. Look for calls for the US to send in the troops – especially if Al Qaeda gets mentioned enough times, or the rebels end up being not so revolutionary. (“Just as long as they are our kind of revolutionary”) Obama’s rhetoric was seen as having a little too much of the George W’s about it – by (shock! horror!) Fox News. Do you think they’re finally catching on that Obama is really just another neo-liberal neo-con in disguise? Me neither, but Sarah Palin did.

Meanwhile, uprisings continue in Syria. Somewhere in a place called Afghanistan a guy named Karzai asked the US and NATO to leave the country.

At the same time – right at this moment – Bradley Manning is still in solitary confinement. Obama supports this ongoing torture of a US citizen, and the implications are profound for all of us who believe in free speech and basic human rights.

Australia is getting those cancer-causing airport full-body scanner machines – but with the promise that they won’t be the ‘naked’ types currently used in the US. I’m sure my growing melanoma will appreciate the privacy.

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